0 votes
1 view
in AI and Deep Learning by (50.2k points)

I have built a regular ANN–BP setup with one unit on the input and output layer and 4 nodes in hidden with the sigmoid. Giving it a simple task to approximate linear f(n) = n with n in range 0-100.

PROBLEM: Regardless of the number of layers, units in the hidden layer or whether or not I am using bias in node values it learns to approximate f(n) = Average(dataset) like so:

enter image description here

The code is written in JavaScript as a proof of concept. I have defined three classes: Net, Layer, and Connection, where Layer is an array of input, bias and output values, Connection is a 2D array of weights and delta weights. Here is the Layer code where all-important calculations happen:

Ann.Layer = function(nId, oNet, oConfig, bUseBias, aInitBiases)

{

var _oThis = this;

var _initialize = function()

{

_oThis.id = nId;

_oThis.length = oConfig.nodes;

_oThis.outputs = new Array(oConfig.nodes); _oThis.inputs = new Array(oConfig.nodes); _oThis.gradients = new Array(oConfig.nodes); _oThis.biases = new Array(oConfig.nodes); _oThis.outputs.fill(0);

_oThis.inputs.fill(0);

_oThis.biases.fill(0);

if (bUseBias) {

for (var n=0; n<oConfig.nodes;n++)

{ _oThis.biases[n] = Ann.random(aInitBiases[0], aInitBiases[1]); } } }; /****************** PUBLIC ******************/ this.id; this.length; this.inputs; this.outputs;

this.gradients;

this.biases;

this.next;

this.previous;

this.inConnection;

this.outConnection;

this.isInput = function() { return !this.previous; } this.isOutput = function() { return !this.next; } this.calculateGradients = function(aTarget) { var n, n1, nOutputError, fDerivative = Ann.Activation.Derivative[oConfig.activation]; if (this.isOutput()) { for (n=0; n<oConfig.nodes; n++) { nOutputError = this.outputs[n] - aTarget[n]; this.gradients[n] = nOutputError * fDerivative(this.outputs[n]); } }

else {

for (n=0; n<oConfig.nodes; n++)

{ nOutputError = 0.0;

for (n1=0; n1<this.outConnection.weights[n].length; n1++)

{ nOutputError += this.outConnection.weights[n][n1] * this.next.gradients[n1]; } // console.log(this.id, nOutputError, this.outputs[n], fDerivative(this.outputs[n])); this.gradients[n] = nOutputError * fDerivative(this.outputs[n]); } } } this.updateInputWeights = function() { if (!this.isInput())

{ var nY, nX, nOldDeltaWeight, nNewDeltaWeight; for (nX=0; nX<this.previous.length; nX++)

{ for (nY=0; nY<this.length; nY++)

{ nOldDeltaWeight = this.inConnection.deltaWeights[nX][nY]; nNewDeltaWeight = - oNet.learningRate * this.previous.outputs[nX] * this.gradients[nY] // Add momentum, a fraction of old delta weight + oNet.learningMomentum * nOldDeltaWeight;

if (nNewDeltaWeight == 0 && nOldDeltaWeight != 0) { console.log('Double overflow');

} this.inConnection.deltaWeights[nX][nY] = nNewDeltaWeight;

this.inConnection.weights[nX][nY] += nNewDeltaWeight; } } } }

this.updateInputBiases = function()

{ if (bUseBias && !this.isInput())

{ var n, nNewDeltaBias;

for (n=0; n<this.length; n++)

{ nNewDeltaBias = - oNet.learningRate * this.gradients[n];

this.biases[n] += nNewDeltaBias;

} } }

this.feedForward = function(a)

{ var fActivation = Ann.Activation[oConfig.activation]; this.inputs = a;

if (this.isInput()) {

this.outputs = this.inputs;

} else { for (var n=0; n<a.length; n++) { this.outputs[n] = fActivation(a[n] + this.biases[n]); } } if (!this.isOutput()) { this.outConnection.feedForward(this.outputs); } } _initialize(); }

The main feedForward and backProp functions are defined like so:

this.feedForward = function(a) { this.layers[0].feedForward(a); this.netError = 0; } this.backPropagate = function(aExample, aTarget) { this.target = aTarget; if (aExample.length != this.getInputCount()) { throw "Wrong input count in training data"; } if (aTarget.length != this.getOutputCount()) { throw "Wrong output count in training data"; } this.feedForward(aExample); _calculateNetError(aTarget); var oLayer = null, nLast = this.layers.length-1, n; for (n=nLast; n>0; n--) { if (n === nLast) { this.layers[n].calculateGradients(aTarget); } else { this.layers[n].calculateGradients(); } } for (n=nLast; n>0; n--) { this.layers[n].updateInputWeights(); this.layers[n].updateInputBiases(); } }

Connection code is rather simple:

Ann.Connection = function(oNet, oConfig, aInitWeights) { var _oThis = this; var _initialize = function() { var nX, nY, nIn, nOut; _oThis.from = oNet.layers[oConfig.from]; _oThis.to = oNet.layers[oConfig.to]; nIn = _oThis.from.length; nOut = _oThis.to.length; _oThis.weights = new Array(nIn); _oThis.deltaWeights = new Array(nIn); for (nX=0; nX<nIn; nX++) { _oThis.weights[nX] = new Array(nOut); _oThis.deltaWeights[nX] = new Array(nOut); _oThis.deltaWeights[nX].fill(0); for (nY=0; nY<nOut; nY++) { _oThis.weights[nX][nY] = Ann.random(aInitWeights[0], aInitWeights[1]); } } }; /****************** PUBLIC ******************/ this.weights; this.deltaWeights; this.from; this.to; this.feedForward = function(a) { var n, nX, nY, aOut = new Array(this.to.length); for (nY=0; nY<this.to.length; nY++) { n = 0; for (nX=0; nX<this.from.length; nX++) { n += a[nX] * this.weights[nX][nY]; } aOut[nY] = n; } this.to.feedForward(aOut); } _initialize(); }

And my activation functions and derivatives are defined like so:

Ann.Activation = { linear : function(n) { return n; }, sigma : function(n) { return 1.0 / (1.0 + Math.exp(-n)); }, tanh : function(n) { return Math.tanh(n); } } Ann.Activation.Derivative = { linear : function(n) { return 1.0; }, sigma : function(n) { return n * (1.0 - n); }, tanh : function(n) { return 1.0 - n * n; } }

And configuration JSON for the network is as follows:

var Config = { id : "Config1", learning_rate : 0.01, learning_momentum : 0, init_weight : [-1, 1], init_bias : [-1, 1], use_bias : false, layers: [ {nodes : 1}, {nodes : 4, activation : "sigma"}, {nodes : 1, activation : "linear"} ], connections: [ {from : 0, to : 1}, {from : 1, to : 2} ] }

Perhaps, your experienced eye can spot the problem with my calculations?

See example in JSFiddle

1 Answer

0 votes
by (108k points)

It may be beneficial for your model to transform (normalize) both your input and your desired output to lie in [0, 1] instead of [0, 100]. This would make it more likely for your sigmoid layer to produce good results (though I'm still not sure if it would be enough, because you're still introducing a nonlinearity in a case where you intend to learn a linear function, and you may need more hidden nodes to correct for that). In ''real-world'' cases, where you have multiple different input variables, this is also typically done, because it ensures that all input variables are treated as being equally important initially. You could always do a preprocessing step where you normalize the input to [0, 1], give that as input to the network, train it to produce output in [0, 1], and then add a postprocessing step where you transform the output back to the original range.

If you want to learn about ANN regression then visit this Artificial Neural Network (ANN) Tutorial.

Welcome to Intellipaat Community. Get your technical queries answered by top developers !

Categories

...