• Articles
  • Tutorials
  • Interview Questions

Podman Vs. Docker - Major Differences (2024)

Tutorial Playlist

Podman and Docker are widely used and highly regarded among the various containerization platforms. In this comparison, we’ll explore the fundamentals of Podman and Docker, examine how they work, and the benefits they offer. By the end, you’ll have a solid foundation to discern which tool suits your needs best.

What is Podman?

What is Podman

Podman is an open-source container engine that allows users to manage and run containers without requiring a separate daemon process. It provides a secure and lightweight alternative to Docker, enabling container creation, deployment, and management within a user namespace. 

Podman supports a pod-based architecture, allowing multiple containers to be grouped and managed collectively. It ensures compatibility with Docker images and container runtimes while offering enhanced security features such as rootless containers.

Want to know more about Docker in detail, enroll in Docker Certification Training Course!

Working of Podman

Podman is a containerization tool that empowers users to manage and run containers on Linux systems. It provides a command-line interface for container operations and can be used as an alternative to Docker.

The working of Podman involves the following key concepts:

  • Containers: Containers are lightweight, isolated environments that encapsulate an application and its dependencies. Podman allows users to create, manage, and run containers on a Linux host.
  • Images: An image is a read-only template that defines a container’s file system and runtime requirements. Podman utilizes container images built from scratch or from remote registries like Docker Hub. Images provide a portable and reproducible way to package applications.
  • Podman Architecture: Podman follows a client-server architecture. The Podman daemon, called Podmand, runs as a background service on the host and manages container operations. The Podman client, podman, is a command-line tool used to interact with the daemon and execute container-related commands.
  • Container Lifecycle: Podman provides commands to manage the lifecycle of containers. Users can create a new container from an image, start and stop containers, pause and resume their execution, and remove them when no longer needed. Podman also supports attaching to running containers for interactive sessions.
  • Container Networking: Podman enables containers to communicate with each other and the external network. It supports various networking options, including bridge networks, which provide connectivity between containers on the same host. It also supports overlay networks for communication across multiple hosts.
  • Container Storage: Podman allows users to manage persistent storage for containers. It supports binding host directories or files to containers, allowing data to be shared between the host and the container. Users can also create and manage container-local storage volumes.
  • Security Isolation: Podman leverages Linux kernel features such as Namespaces and cgroups to provide strong isolation between containers. Each container has its own isolated file system, process space, network stack, and resource limits, ensuring that containers do not interfere with each other.
  • Rootless Mode: Podman offers a rootless mode that allows non-root users to run containers without requiring administrator privileges. This enhances security by reducing the attack surface and mitigating potential risks.

Learn more about Docker Tutorial for Beginners!

Cloud Computing EPGC IITR iHUB

What is Docker?

What is Docker

Docker is a popular open-source platform that simplifies container creation, deployment, and management. It uses containerization technology to encapsulate applications and their dependencies into portable units called containers. 

Docker provides an ecosystem of tools and services that enable developers to build, share, and deploy containerized applications efficiently. With its emphasis on standardization, Docker allows users to package applications along with their dependencies into Docker images, facilitating consistent deployment across different environments. 

Want to excel in your interview? Refer to our Top Docker Interview Questions and Answers!

Working of Docker

The working of Docker involves the following key components and concepts:

  • Containers: Containers are lightweight, standalone execution environments that encapsulate an application along with its dependencies, libraries, and configuration files. Docker allows users to create and manage containers using container images.
  • Images: An image is a read-only template that defines a container’s filesystem and runtime requirements. Docker images are built from instructions written in a Dockerfile, which specifies the base image, software packages, environment variables, and other settings needed for the application.
  • Docker Engine: The Docker Engine is the core component of Docker that runs and manages containers. It consists of a server docker daemon called dockerd, which runs as a background service on the host, and a command-line client called docker, which is used to interact with the daemon and execute container-related commands.
  • Container Lifecycle: Docker provides commands to manage the lifecycle of containers. Users can create a new container from an image, start and stop containers, pause and resume their execution, and remove them when no longer needed. Docker also supports attaching to running containers for interactive sessions.
  • Container Networking: Docker empowers containers to communicate with each other and the external network. It offers networking options such as bridge networks, which create an internal network for containers on the same host, and overlay networks, which allow communication across multiple hosts.
  • Container Storage: Docker allows users to manage persistent storage for containers. It supports volume mounts, which allow host directories or files to be accessed by containers. It also supports Docker volumes, which are managed storage areas that persist even after the container is deleted.
  • Docker Registry: Docker images can be stored and shared through Docker registries. The default public registry is Docker Hub, but users can also set up their own private registries. Registries serve as repositories for images, facilitating distribution and collaboration among developers.
  • Orchestration: Docker offers container orchestration tools like Docker Compose and Docker Swarm. These tools facilitate the management of multiple containers across multiple hosts, empowering users to define and deploy intricate applications using a declarative methodology.

Get 100% Hike!

Master Most in Demand Skills Now !

Differences Between Podman Vs. Docker

Differences Between Podman Vs. Docker

Below is a comparison table outlining the distinctions between Podman and Docker:

PodmanDocker
Podman can pull, push, and manage container images without requiring a separate daemon process. It uses the Container Image Specification (OCI) to interact with images.Docker requires a daemon process running in the background to manage container images. It uses its own Docker image format and registry.
Podman does not require a background daemon process to run containers. Containers are managed directly by the user, providing greater security and flexibility.Docker relies on a background daemon process (dockerd) to manage containers, which can introduce potential security risks.
Podman allows users to run containers as non-root users, enhancing security by minimizing the privileges required to manage containers.Docker primarily runs containers as the root user, which can pose security risks as a compromise in one container could impact the entire host system. However, Docker does offer experimental rootless support.
Podman aims to be compatible with the Docker command-line interface. Most Docker commands can be used with Podman with only minor modifications, making it easier for users to transition.Docker has its own command-line interface, and the commands used to manage containers, images, and networks are specific to Docker.
Podman leverages Linux Security Modules (LSM) and provides enhanced security features such as SELinux and seccomp. It offers more fine-grained control over container security policies.Docker also supports SELinux and seccomp, but it may require additional configuration to achieve the same level of security as Podman.

Check out our beginner-friendly Docker Tutorial to learn how to containerize your applications easily!

Conclusion

To wrap up, both Podman and Docker are robust containerization tools, each excelling in different aspects. Podman shines with its lightweight container management, advanced security features, simplified image handling, and ability to work with Docker images. 

Meanwhile, Docker stands out for its user-friendly interface, extensive ecosystem, and seamless integration throughout the development-to-production cycle. 

Choosing between Podman and Docker should be based on individual needs, such as security demands, ecosystem compatibility, and user-friendliness. 

Still in doubt? Contact us at our Community Page!

Course Schedule

Name Date Details
AWS Certification 20 Apr 2024(Sat-Sun) Weekend Batch
View Details
AWS Certification 27 Apr 2024(Sat-Sun) Weekend Batch
View Details
AWS Certification 04 May 2024(Sat-Sun) Weekend Batch
View Details

Cloud-banner.png